Brown Girl: Decolonized

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Dis/orient/ed Comedy Returns to PDX! SAT OCT 18!

Tumblr! Please help me boost this post! Presale code “getdisoriented” expires TONIGHT at 11:55pm! If you’re in the Portland, Oregon area come on down to the Mekong Bistro in Northeast Portland this Saturday! If you’re not in Oregon, help us spread the word! 

You can read more about my involvement with this event here.

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Join the Asian Pacific American Network of Oregon (APANO) on Saturday, Oct 18 for a night of Asian and Pacific Islander women in comedy and raising awareness on reproductive justice issues!

Dis/orient/ed Comedy Returns to PDX!
When: Saturday, October 18
Location: Mekong Bistro (8200 NE Siskiyou St, Portland, OR 97220)
Time: 7:30 cocktail hour, 8:00 show start
Tickets: $25 general admission, presale code "getdisoriented" to save on tickets! Buy your tickets here!
FEATURING:
+ SHANNON KOYANO (SEATTLE. PARLOR LIVE)
+ BRI PRUETT (PORTLAND. ALL JANE NO DICK COMEDY FESTIVAL, BRIDGETOWN COMEDY FESTIVAL)
+ JEN TAM (PORTLAND. CYNIC CAVE, AM I RIGHT, LADIES? A TOTALLY RADICAL FEMINIST COMEDY SHOWCASE)
+ D’LO (LOS ANGELES. HBO’S LOOKING, DYKECENTRAL) 

HOST:
   JENNY YANG (LOS ANGELES. SHOWTIME’S “WHY WE LAUGH: FUNNY WOMEN”, BUZZFEED VIDEO, DIS/ORIENT/ED COMEDY)
The mission of Dis/orient/ed Comedy is to showcase female Asian American comics ranging from Sri Lankan boi D’Lo to Egyptian American Maria Shehata - they loosely define “Asian” and “Female” with a focus on sharing talent of those who aren’t typically featured to mainstream comedy audiences. By organizing the Dis/orient/ed Standup Tour, APANO is promoting the work of Asian Pacific American females and supporting a space for them to share their comedy with the Portland community. 

Sponsorship and funds raised will go supporting APANO’s Strong Families working group. Just as Asian and Pacific Islander women comedians are faced with challenges in mainstream media, our families are challenged with policies and stagnant images that do not reflect our diverse familial structures and cultures. Funds raised from this event will support the ongoing efforts that our Strong Families working group is currently doing for the reproductive justice movement. 

pinoy-culture:

JUSTICE FOR JENNIFER LAUDE !

END THE MILITARY EXERCISES AND VISITING FORCES AGREEMENT!

KICK OUT THE U.S. MILITARY OUT OF THE PHILIPPINES !

If you live in NYC, come join us for the action and rally on Wednesday, October 15 at 5 pm in front of the Philippines Embassy.

When: Wednesday, October 15, 2014 at 5 pm.
Where: 556 Fifth Avenue, New York front of the Philippines Embassy

If you haven’t heard already in Philippine news and now some U.S. news outlets like ABC News & The New York Post, yesterday night a transgender woman name Jennifer Laude was found murdered inside the Celzone Lodge on Magsaysay Drive in Olangapo City, Zambales. She was found, strangled with her head leaning over the toilet by one of the hotel attendants who was also a witness. The attendant, Elias Gallamos, witnessed a white man with blonde hair and a marine cut walking out of the hotel room a few minutes after both he and Jennifer went in. According to Elias the suspect left the door open and Elias went to check the room but saw slippers outside the bathroom so believed someone was inside using the room and he left. Later, they returned to check back in the hotel room and discovered Jennifers body.

Earlier on in the night another witness, the victim’s friend, said they met the suspect at the Ambyanz Disco Bar at 10:55 p.m. Jennifer then invited the suspect to the hotel and asked the witness to leave before the suspect found out they were both transgender.

Both witnesses describe the man as having a “white complexion, with marine-style cut of hair,” standing between 5’8″ and 5’10” and between 25 and 30 years old.

The suspect is now detained in the USS Peleliu assault ship as the investigation continues. However according to the VFA any military servicemen who has committed a crime in the Philippines must be held by U.S. officials not Philippine officials. Basically the U.S. military is hiding behind the VFA (which they created) for the suspect and any other military personel stationed on the islands to gain immunity and escape prosecution from Philippines laws.

Now people, especially the family members and friends of Jennifer, are worried that the U.S. ships can leave at any time and justice won’t be served as the suspect and 3 other suspects of the case will not be turned over to Philippines authorities. Though officials say the ship will not be able to leave the port until the case is solved many worry this will not be the case.

We call for the U.S. to turn over the suspects to Philippine officials for investigation. We call for justice for Jennifer Laude in which its clearly a hate crime and for the numerous rape cases by U.S. military who have escaped prosecution. 

JUSTICE !

(via dianchuoidi)

pag-asaharibon:

Enter The Escrima: Bruce Lee And Filipino Martial Arts

Bruce Lee is regarded as one of the greatest martial artists, if not the greatest master of the art to ever live. His art revolutionized cinema forever, changing the way the western world perceived martial arts. Over the course of his life, Lee’s fame came not only from his films, but also from the creation of his own art. Jeet Kun Do, “the way of the intercepting fist,” drew influences from every art Lee studied, which included Filipino martial arts.
What many may not know is that Lee was an avid practitioner of the Filipino escrima (stick fighting). Danny Inosanto (a Filipino American), one of Lee’s closest friends and finest students, introduced him to the art. Inosanto recalled how Lee at first “took a pretty dim view of it” but later explained “what he liked and didn’t like about escrima.” Inosanto believes “what changed (Lee’s) mind was the emphasis on the empty hands and seeing through the movies that it had a lot of functional value.” From the repertoire of Bruce Lee masterpieces, two films stand out the most in terms of Lee’s links to Filipino martial arts – “Enter the Dragon” and “Game of Death.”
In “Enter the Dragon,” (YouTube) Inosanto, explained, the message Lee wanted to convey to the public was to “know all combative ranges; be able to pick up anything and be able to use it.” This is best illustrated in the fight scene with the guards in which Lee uses their own weapons against them. Lee demonstrates escrima, using doble baston (double sticks) to subdue the guards. This concept is directly related to Filipino martial arts because of the ability to adapt to the environment and utilize it to one’s own advantage.  
In “Game of Death,” (YouTube) Lee fights Inosanto using both double sticks as well as nunchaku. What many may not know is, Inosanto taught Lee how to use nunchaku through the Filipino equivalent called tabok-toyok. During the process of the film, Inosanto explained, “Bruce’s original concept for ‘Game of Death’ was to educate the film viewing public by making people aware that there are many different types of martial arts and that each martial art has a value in a certain environment.”
Because many Filipino martial arts are weapons-based systems, it could be assumed that Inosanto was chosen for the film to properly represent the art. The movie also touches on the aspect of adaptation as the film progresses; Lee must eventually fight Kareem Abdul-Jabbar who is seven feet tall.
From these two movies and the concepts drawn from them, you can see how Filipino martial arts helped promote the success of Bruce Lee. Many are unaware that Filipino martial arts exist, yet they had been utilized by one of the most iconic martial artists to ever live. Today, more than 40 years after Lee’s death, his legacy lives on, intertwined with Filipino martial arts and will continue to do for generations to come.
AJ Ruiz is the Public Relations Manager for Eskabo Daan in San Francisco. He is currently pursuing a Masters Degree in Asian American Studies at San Francisco State University.

See also:
Guro Inosanto Filipino Martial Arts Demo at the Smithsonian (YouTube)
Filipino Heritage in Martial Arts
10 Best Movie Fight Scenes Using Filipino Martial Arts

pag-asaharibon:

Enter The Escrima: Bruce Lee And Filipino Martial Arts

Bruce Lee is regarded as one of the greatest martial artists, if not the greatest master of the art to ever live. His art revolutionized cinema forever, changing the way the western world perceived martial arts. Over the course of his life, Lee’s fame came not only from his films, but also from the creation of his own art. Jeet Kun Do, “the way of the intercepting fist,” drew influences from every art Lee studied, which included Filipino martial arts.

What many may not know is that Lee was an avid practitioner of the Filipino escrima (stick fighting). Danny Inosanto (a Filipino American), one of Lee’s closest friends and finest students, introduced him to the art. Inosanto recalled how Lee at first “took a pretty dim view of it” but later explained “what he liked and didn’t like about escrima.” Inosanto believes “what changed (Lee’s) mind was the emphasis on the empty hands and seeing through the movies that it had a lot of functional value.” From the repertoire of Bruce Lee masterpieces, two films stand out the most in terms of Lee’s links to Filipino martial arts – “Enter the Dragon” and “Game of Death.”

In “Enter the Dragon,” (YouTube) Inosanto, explained, the message Lee wanted to convey to the public was to “know all combative ranges; be able to pick up anything and be able to use it.” This is best illustrated in the fight scene with the guards in which Lee uses their own weapons against them. Lee demonstrates escrima, using doble baston (double sticks) to subdue the guards. This concept is directly related to Filipino martial arts because of the ability to adapt to the environment and utilize it to one’s own advantage.  

In “Game of Death,” (YouTube) Lee fights Inosanto using both double sticks as well as nunchaku. What many may not know is, Inosanto taught Lee how to use nunchaku through the Filipino equivalent called tabok-toyok. During the process of the film, Inosanto explained, “Bruce’s original concept for ‘Game of Death’ was to educate the film viewing public by making people aware that there are many different types of martial arts and that each martial art has a value in a certain environment.”

Because many Filipino martial arts are weapons-based systems, it could be assumed that Inosanto was chosen for the film to properly represent the art. The movie also touches on the aspect of adaptation as the film progresses; Lee must eventually fight Kareem Abdul-Jabbar who is seven feet tall.

From these two movies and the concepts drawn from them, you can see how Filipino martial arts helped promote the success of Bruce Lee. Many are unaware that Filipino martial arts exist, yet they had been utilized by one of the most iconic martial artists to ever live. Today, more than 40 years after Lee’s death, his legacy lives on, intertwined with Filipino martial arts and will continue to do for generations to come.

AJ Ruiz is the Public Relations Manager for Eskabo Daan in San Francisco. He is currently pursuing a Masters Degree in Asian American Studies at San Francisco State University.

See also: